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Vessels

With home ports in Canada’s Arctic, ARF’s growing fleet of research vessels are on the water as soon as the sea ice recedes. This means ARF and its partners can take full advantage of the Arctic’s short navigable season each summer to perform marine research and complete other time-sensitive projects, including environmental monitoring missions. 

The vessels are maintained and operated by ARF and crewed by members of the Royal Canadian Navy through a unique partnership that's also serving to build Canadian Forces capacity in Arctic operations and enhance Canadian sovereignty. In just a few short years, the RV Martin Bergmann has established itself as an Arctic workhorse, acting as platform for scientific research, archeological exploration and mapping waterways. It has been proudly embraced in its home port of Cambridge Bay, NV., home of the Canadian High Arctic Research Station. In many ways the Bergmann, with its iconic ARF logo, has become a symbol of the community’s growing status as a hub for Arctic science

 

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RV Martin Bergmann

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Kitimat II

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White Diamond

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Labs

ARF's mobile science labs and art studios are an innovative  solution to the Arctic’s current dearth of infrastructure. They’re also a powerful example of how ARF’s flexible, low-cost approach can have an outsized impact above the Arctic Circle. 

Built out of sea containers, the labs are heated, insulated and equipped with toilets, water purifiers and satellite communication links. The labs are also capable of plugging into existing power networks or running completely off the grid, drawing electricity through environmentally friendly solar panels or wind turbines. Best of all, they can be moved wherever they’re needed—from remote Arctic research sites to bustling tourist areas. 

 

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NGO News Publication  |  April 2016

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